Redcrosse the Holy

Redcrosse, the hero of book 1 and “the knight of Holinesse,” (Book 1, canto 1) makes an appearance in book 3 of The Faerie Queen by Edmund Spenser. He appears in the first canto where Britomart is questing around. After both Guyon and Arthur chase after Florimell and the forester, Britomart continues on her journey alone until she reaches a castle. Outside she finds a battle between one man and apparently six guards of the castle. Britomart, always one to be mediator, interrupts the fight and asks why these six men were attacking the one valiant man. She soon finds out that the man is Redcrosse and he was fighting to defend the truth of his love with Una. Britomart quickly subdues the guards, all brothers, and they enter the Castle Joyeous. This is Redcrosse’s first appearance in Book 3 of The Faerie Queene.

Redcrosse appears again after the scene with Malecasta and Britomart in bed. Redcrosse comes to the rescue of Britomart after she is wounded by Gargante (one of the six brothers) and the two fight their way out of the castle. They shortly split up and go on their own journeys. During Britomart’s and Redcrosse’s interactions, Britomart spoke of her true love, Arthegall. Redcrosse speaks well of her true love and Britomart feels sad that she is not with him. Redcrosse makes a small, but interesting, appearance in Book 3.

Redcrosse is the focus of Book 1. This book deals with the virtue of holiness. Redcrosse’s name apparently comes from his shield that has a red cross on the front. He is tasked to kill a Dragon and on his journeys he meets a woman Una and her dwarf servant. He quickly falls in love with her and through some trials and tribulations he marries her at the end of the book. Throughout the book he represents holiness in many ways. I plan to incorporate some Book 1 allusions in my creation of the NPC Redcrosse. I would also like to convey his holiness through my dialogue trees and his actions in-game. I am excited to start creating my own Faerie Queene world!

-Seth

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