Lazy? Not with my toothpick in hand!

Oh, the wonder! Remember those days when you sat at home wondering what you were going to do because you were so bored out of your mind that you had taken to counting the number of times your mother said: “Why don’t you find something to do?” Well, I don’t. My situation differed in many aspects because like those “dirty slobs” who sit around and do nothing I had taken up the art of video-gaming. I recall the times my parents would scream at me saying things that bordered the lines of “Why don’t you go outside, its such a lovely day?” or “Are you ever going to do something productive?” Productive? Mom, I just killed the equivalent of Genghis Khan with a toothpick in two hours, what do you call that? Of course she would storm off, rolling her eyes and muttering disappointment in herself and I for making me such a lazy son.

Ahh, she would never understand the complexity that it requires to be a hard-core gamer. Not only must you be proficient in every skill known to man, but you also have to be able to ignore the constant ravings of other players who we would call “trolls.” Which brings up another topic of the community and environment. We (all of us gamers out there) have had that time in our lives, maybe even multiple times, where others have challenged our social interaction with “real-life” people. I guess it is difficult to understand that I talk to thousands of people a day from all around the world with hundreds of ideas, lifestyles, and beliefs. Yes, I have never met them in person, and no, I probably never will, but does that make it any different than you walking around town and meeting someone for an hour at the same grocery store? In fact, my interactions actually mean a little more than the people who are your “friends” from school. Now what most people don’t understand is the immense amount of self immersion into a video game. I mean, when I enter a game I get lost in the colors and the bright visualizations of the characters and the complicated plots of the story line and side quests. Players are no longer players, but people that will either hinder or assist me in my journey to complete my objective. Consider the mind of a painter. When he/she sits down to concoct their masterpiece, most of the time, they have no clue as to how they are going to start and they simply let their imagination run with it. In a sense it runs parallel with the interaction of a player and the game. Much like the concept in Gamer Theory, people forget who they are, or more precisely who they are supposed to be when they play a game. Most have no clue what they want to do when they start and they probably start to use their own lives to influence how they play the game. They get caught up in the lore and the objectives that they sometimes have a hard time remembering that they are supposed to eat (or in my case, take out the trash…) So, of course I was the same way and I had the constant reminder from my parents that I needed to find something to do with my life.

Remember, my fellow gamers: life isn’t like a box of chocolates. Rather, its just a heart-shaped box full of nothing, waiting to be filled with whatever magical mana-boosting candies you could imagine.

~~D3LTA04 (Chris Davis)

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1 thought on “Lazy? Not with my toothpick in hand!”

  1. Absolutely loved the ending! I much prefer that saying to the “life is a box of chocolates” stuff. Makes me feel like I have more control over things. 😛
    I wish more people could see games this way, instead of viewing them as anti-social wastes of time. Like you said, gamers can easily be very social, just in a slightly different way.

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