Braid: The convenient platformer

In most video games, especially platformers, the player’s character is able to be killed in some manner and then respawns at the beginning of the level. This requires the player to start the level over and do everything correctly in a single run in order to progress. In contrast, Braid incorporates a type of “rewind” mechanic that allows the player to rewind time. For example, if a player accidentally falls off a ledge to their death, they can conveniently “rewind” to the point right before they jumped off and choose a different path.

This rewind mechanic is in stark contrast to most video game mechanics and everyday life. For example, In Super Mario Bros., we are unable to rewind up to the point where we die to Bowser. We have to re-do much of the level. In everyday life, we unable to rewind and perhaps not say what we just said or do what we just did. Braid is a sort-of escape from the norm – a fantasy world (the aesthetics demonstrate this as well) where we can undo our previous mistakes and finish the level in “one” go.

Another interesting corollary to Braid’s rewind mechanic is that some things in the game world do not rewind with time. Their state persists, or they keep moving as if they are unaffected by time. This made me reflect on things in our life that are not affected by time or, in a fantasy world, “re-dos”. Even if we could rewind real life and undo our actions, what things would persist? Our temperament, personality, our genes – the very essence of who we are – would be unaffected by re-dos. No matter how often we would rewind time (if we could) we would still be the same person. This is the main take-away for me, personally. Sure, I may change what I like or where I live or who I call friends, but who I am will  persist throughout my time. I can’t change who I am (not that I want to, but if I did, I couldn’t). I must live with it and embrace it.

-Thomas

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One thought on “Braid: The convenient platformer”

  1. I agree with you with drawing the similarity to the Mario, but I really liked that you brought up the way the special objects interact with the world. This is a point I haven’t seen anyone bring up yet. Even in a game where the main character has the god-like power of reversing time, he is still humanized with some limitations and challenges. I think there is something there that many video games teach us about ourselves that we don’t recognize. No matter the seeming omnipotence of our in-game avatar or characters, there’s always something you can’t change or save yourself from. This teaches us about ourselves by reminding us about our intrinsic mortality.

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